Spine Neurosurgery Service

NeuroSpine

The Neurosurgical Spine Service at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in neurosurgical treatment of the entire spectrum of spine disorders, providing services from diagnosis through surgery and rehabilitation.

A Complete Range of Services
The Neurosurgical Spine Service at Massachusetts General Hospital focuses on nervous system-related problems of the entire spine from the neck to the lower back, including recurring pain, nerve compression syndromes, herniated intervertebral discs and spinal cord compression syndromes.
Patients may come to the Neurosurgical Spine Service for a consultation or a second opinion or for all of their treatments.
At our Spine Evaluation Center patients are seen by our senior neurosurgeons where they receive detailed diagnosis and treatment evaluation. When surgery is necessary, they are referred to the operating neurosurgeons.
Specialized Expertise
Neurosurgical evaluation of neck and back pain, nerve compression syndromes, herniated intervertebral discs, and spinal cord compression syndromes. Information regarding peripheral nerve (including nerve compression such as carpal tunnel syndrome) and spine surgery and the Neurosurgical Service's Spine Evaluation Unit.
Unique Scale and Experience
Spine Neurosurgeons - Spine surgeons with special expertise in cervical thoracic, lumbar, and lumbosacral intervertebral disc removal, treatment of spine fractures and other spine injuries, spinal synovial or ganglion cysts, spinal cord herniation syndromes, Arnold Chiari-Malformation, syringomyelia, vertebral hemangiomas, schwannomas (neuromas), neurofibromas, gliomas (including astrocytoma, olgiodendroglioma, ependymoma, and ganglioglioma) chordomas, spinal chondrosarcomas, other spine tumors, and surgery for spinal stenosis.
A Multidisciplinary Program
A Team Approach to Care

Our multidisciplinary team includes neurosurgeons, neurologists, pain specialists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians and therapists.

Spine Evaluation Center
The Purpose of this Center is to provide a complete range of services for the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with spine and peripheral nerve disorders. Staffed by experienced, senior neurosurgeons, the Spine Evaluation Center works with patients to diagnose their condition and determine the most appropriate treatment. Patients may be referred for consultation only, care in partnership with referring physician, or complete management.
The Spine Evaluation Center has been established to provide timely out-patient consultation for patients with neurosurgical neurosurgical evaluation of neck and back pain. Patients with routine or complicated spinal disc syndromes as well as undiagnosed neurological problems related to the spine will be evaluated. This will include cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spondylitic disorders with or without nerve root compression, spinal cord compression, herniated intervertebral discs, spinal cord tumors, syringomyelia, or other congenital spine disorders.
The center also provides outpatient consultations and evaluations for routine or complicated spinal disc syndromes, as well as undiagnosed neurological conditions related to the spine. Patients can request:
  • Second opinions for diagnosis, treatment, surgery and management
  • Low back diagnosis, for patients who have already had multiple surgical procedures and are considering additional treatment or therapy
  • Independent medical evaluation, which includes reviews of medical records for insurance carriers and law offices
  • Neurological work-ups and care, including scheduling and diagnostic studies such as an evaluation of myelogram-CTs, MRIs, X-rays and all other neuro-investigative studies

Some Conditions Treated in Spine Neurosurgery
  • Arachnoid cysts -

  • Chiari Malformation - A Chiari malformation is a congenital (present at birth) defect in the area of the back of the head where the brain and spinal cord connect.

    What is a Chiari malformation? - The condition is also called Arnold Chiari malformation. There are four types of Chiari malformations, including the following:

    • Type I. Commonly goes unnoticed until problems arise in the adolescent or adult years of life. In this condition, the base of the skull and the upper spinal area are not formed properly.
    • Type II. This is the most common type of Chiari malformation. In this condition, part of the back of the brain shifts downward through the bottom of the skull area.
    • Type II Chiari malformations are typically seen in infants who are born with spina bifida, a neurological condition that causes a portion of the spinal cord and the surrounding structures to develop outside, instead of inside, the body.
    • Type II Chiari malformations can also be associated with a condition known as hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is a condition in which there is an overproduction or lack of absorption of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) that is found inside of the ventricles (fluid-filled areas) inside of the brain. The increased fluid causes the pressure inside of the head to increase and the skull bones to expand to a larger-than-normal appearance.
    • Type III. The back of the brain protrudes out of an opening in the back of the skull area.
    • Type IV. The back of the brain fails to develop normally.

    ... read more ... or see the ...

    Brain Aneurysm & AVM Center: The Endovascular and Open Vascular Neurosurgery Program at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in Neuroendovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord, including brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and carotid disease. For patients with aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) as well as other neurovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord.

  • Diplomyelia or diastematomyelia -

  • Disc Disease (Herniated Disc) - Lumbar disc disease occurs in the lumbar area of the spine. As discs degenerate, fragments of the disc material can press on the nerve roots located just behind the disc space, causing pain, numbness or changes in sensation.

    Anatomy of the lumbar spine - The vertebral column, also called the backbone, is made up of 33 vertebrae that are separated by spongy disks and classified into four distinct areas. The cervical area consists of seven bony parts in the neck; the thoracic spine consists of 12 bony parts in the back area; the lumbar spine consists of five bony segments in the lower back area; five sacral bones (fused into one bone, the sacrum); and four coccygeal bones (fused into one bone, the coccyx).

    Lumbar disk disease occurs in the lumbar area of the spine. The lumbar area of the spine (and other areas of the spine) is made up of two parts, including the following:

    • Vertebral bodies. The parts that are made of bone.
    • Intervertebral disks (also known as the disks). The disks are located between the bony parts of the spine and act as "shock absorbers" for the spine.

    ... read more ... or see the ...

    Neurosurgery Spine Service: The Neurosurgical Spine Service at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in neurosurgical treatment of the entire spectrum of spine disorders, providing services from diagnosis through surgery and rehabilitation. Neurosurgical evaluation of neck and back pain, nerve compression syndromes, herniated intervertebral discs, and spinal cord compression syndromes.

  • Lipomyelomeningocele -

  • Nerve Root Compression -

  • Spina bifida or Myelomeningocele

  • Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM) -

    Cerebrovascular Malformations - Cerebrovascular Malformations are believed to be developmental vascular anomalies that result from failure of the embryonic vascular network to develop properly

    Arteriovenous Malformations - An AVM is composed of a tightly tangled collection of abnormal-appearing, dilated blood vessels that directly shunt arterial blood into the venous system without the usual connecting capillary network. Blood vessels of the AVM are thin walled and tortuous and lack the normal characteristics of veins or arteries. The three morphologic components of an AVM are the nidus, the feeding arteries, and the draining veins. (The literature often refers to the nidus when discussing AVMs; a nidus is defined as the focus of the AVM, that is, the tangle of abnormal vessels.) The vessels of the AVM vary greatly in diameter, but the veins are generally larger than the arteries. The arterial vessels, also called feeder arteries, supply the AVM. Dilated veins without the usual intervening capillary network drain the lesion. As a result of the absence of the capillary network, blood flow is accelerated and the pressure is elevated within the fragile vessels of the AVM. These conditions predispose the lesion to hemorrhage.

    Cavernous Malformations resemeble a mulberry, or "popcorn-like", appearing lesion in the brain, spinal cord, or nerve roots and are compose of sinusoidal-type vessels that are not separted by normal appearing parenchyma (neural tissue). CMs account for approximately 10% of all symptomatic vascular malformations. They are rare in children, representing peak occurrence in the third and fifth decades of life.

    CMs occur in two forms: sporadic, which is characterized by one lesion, or familial, which is characterized by multiple lesions with a a genetic link of inheritance.

    Dural Arteriovenous Malformations - (Dural AVM; Dural arteriovenous fistulas) are almost always acquired lesions, rather than developmental. Dural AVMs comprise 10% to 15% of all intracranial AVMs. They are defined by the following criteria: (1) the nidus of the arteriovenous shunting is within the cranial dural matter, (2) arterial supply arises exclusively from the extracranial circulation or from the meningeal branches of the intracranial branches, and (3) venous drainage is either directly into the dural venous sinus or into nearby leptomeningeal veins

    Venous Malformations also referred to as venous anomalies, are composed of anomalous veins, separated by normal parenchyma, which drain into a dilated venous trunk. These lesions represent an anomalous pattern of drainage. Typically, the goal is to treat them VMs with conservative management practices, as treatment could lead to a venous infarction.

    Aneurysm - An aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the normal diameter.

    What is an aneurysm? - An aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of a blood vessel resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning greater than 50 percent of the vessel's normal diameter (width). An aneurysm may occur in any blood vessel, but is most often seen in an artery rather than a vein.

    ... read more ... or see the ...

    Brain Aneurysm & AVM Center: The Endovascular and Open Vascular Neurosurgery Program at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in Neuroendovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord, including brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and carotid disease. For patients with aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) as well as other neurovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord.

  • Spinal Cord Infections -

  • Spinal Stenosis -

  • Syringomyelia -

  • Tethered Spinal Cords -

  • Acute Spinal Cord Injury - Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic injury that either results in a bruise (also called a contusion), a partial tear, or a complete tear (called a transection) in the spinal cord.

    What is an acute spinal cord injury? - Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is due to a traumatic injury that either results in a bruise (also called a contusion), a partial tear, or a complete tear (called a transection) in the spinal cord. SCI is a common cause of permanent disability and death in children and adults.

    ... read more ... read more ... or see the ...

    Neurosurgery Spine Service: The Neurosurgical Spine Service at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in neurosurgical treatment of the entire spectrum of spine disorders, providing services from diagnosis through surgery and rehabilitation. Neurosurgical evaluation of neck and back pain, nerve compression syndromes, herniated intervertebral discs, and spinal cord compression syndromes. Information regarding peripheral nerve (including nerve compression such as carpal tunnel syndrome) and spine surgery.

  • Head Injury - A head injury is a broad term that describes a vast array of injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head.

    What is a head injury? - Head injuries are one of the most common causes of disability and death in adults. The injury can be as mild as a bump, bruise (contusion), or cut on the head, or can be moderate to severe in nature due to a concussion, deep cut or open wound, fractured skull bone(s), or from internal bleeding and damage to the brain.

    A head injury is a broad term that describes a vast array of injuries that occur to the scalp, skull, brain, and underlying tissue and blood vessels in the head. Head injuries are also commonly referred to as brain injury, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), depending on the extent of the head trauma.

    ... read more ... see also the ...

    Pediatric Neurosurgery : The Pediatric Neurosurgery service at MassGeneral Hospital for Children diagnoses and treats all neurosurgical conditions of infants, children and adolescents, with special expertise in the management of pediatric brain tumors, hydrocephalus, spinal cord disorders, Chiari malformations, craniosynostosis, AVM's and epilepsy surgery.

    ... or see the ...

    Trauma, Emergency, Intensive Care, and General Neurosurgery Center: The Spinal Cord and Head Trauma Center, and the NeuroScience Care Units diagnoses and treats patients with severe spinal cord and brain disorders resulting from trauma. Information on Physical Therapy for Brain Injury.

    Massachusetts General Hospital is a Level 1 Adult and Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center. MGH has been verified as able to treat the highest severity of trauma patient. MGH admits, on average, 2,000 trauma patients and another 2,000 emergency surgery patients per year, and although the vast majority of our patients are from the Boston metropolitan area, patients are referred to our facility from all over the country.

  • Brain and SpineTumors - A brain tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain. The tumor can either originate in the brain itself, or come from another part of the body and travel to the brain (metastasize). Brain tumors may be classified as either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), depending on their behavior.

    What is a brain tumor? - A benign tumor does not contain cancer cells and usually, once removed, does not recur. Most benign brain tumors have clear borders, meaning they do not invade surrounding tissue. These tumors can, however, cause symptoms similar to cancerous tumors because of their size and location in the brain.

    Malignant brain tumors contain cancer cells. Malignant brain tumors are usually fast growing and invade surrounding tissue. Malignant brain tumors very rarely spread to other areas of the body, but may recur after treatment. Sometimes, brain tumors that are not cancer are called malignant because of their size and location, and the damage they can do to vital functions of the brain.

    ... read more ... or see the ...

    MGH Brain Tumor Center : The Stephen E. and Catherine Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital offers the most advanced care for patients with brain tumors and nervous system tumors.

    A coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to the care of adult and pediatric patients with tumors of the nervous system as well as neurologic complications of cancer.

    Malignant Tumors: Information regarding malignant tumors of the brain, spine, and peripheral nerves. Benign Tumors: Information about benign brain tumors including meningioma, epidermoid, dermoid, hemangioblastoma, colloid cyst, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma.



Collaborating for Comprehensive Care
Working together in the Brian D. Silber Spine Tumor Clinic, our neurosurgeons, orthopedic spine surgeons, radiation oncologists and neuro-oncologists diagnose and treat the full range of spine tumors, including vertebral hemangiomas, schwannomas (neuromas), neurofibromas, gliomas (astrocytoma, olgiodendroglioma, ependymoma, and ganglioglioma) chordomas, and spinal chondrosarcomas.
Spine neurosurgeons at Mass General are part of the Spine Tumor Clinic, which supports research into the causes of spine and spinal cord tumors, and sponsors education and support programs for spine tumor patients and their families.

Non-invasive proton beam radiosurgery is the adjuvant treatment of choice for a number of tumors of the spine including chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Proton beam therapy is a highly advanced form of radiosurgery that targets spinal tumors and lesions outside the cranium. This technique minimizes damage to the nervous system and spares nearby cells and tissue from the radiation. Its advantages over other methods of stereotactic radiosurgery for these tumors are based primarily on its ability to optimally target unusually shaped lesions and lesions outside of the cranium.


Collaborating Toward Better Care
Research and Innovation
Mass General surgeons performed the first total limb replant, the first discectomy for a herniated intervertebral disc and the first successful stabilization of atlantoaxial instability of the cervical spine. Our doctors were also the first to demonstrate that herniated lumbar discs are not tumors, leading to new and dramatically better treatments.
Today, the physicians of the Neurological Spine Service are co-leading multicenter research trials that aim to identify which procedures have the best long-term outcomes for specific issues. New studies are introduced regularly, giving patients opportunities to participate in emerging treatment programs and experimental therapies.

The Department of Neurosurgery has surgeons who specialize in all phases of neurological surgery for comprehensive management of brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve diseases and disorders. The subspecialties of the neurosurgical department include:

  • AneurysmAVMBrain Aneurysm & AVM Center - The Endovascular and Open Vascular Neurosurgery Program at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in Neuroendovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord, including brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and carotid disease.
    For patients with aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) as well as other neurovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord. Including the Neurovascular News; - A newsletter with information regarding carotid endarterectomy to prevent stroke, transient ischemic attack or TIA; brain aneurysms; arteriovenous malformations and other vascular lesions affecting the brain and spinal cord with information on the MGH Brain AVM and Aneurysm Center. Information on the MGH Interventional Neuroradiology Center.
    ...read more...
  • BrainTumorMGH Brain Tumor Center - The Stephen E. and Catherine Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital offers the most advanced care for patients with brain tumors and nervous system tumors.
    A coordinated, multidisciplinary approach to the care of adult and pediatric patients with tumors of the nervous system as well as neurologic complications of cancer.
    Malignant Tumors: Information regarding malignant tumors of the brain, spine, and peripheral nerves. Benign Tumors: Information about benign brain tumors including meningioma, epidermoid, dermoid, hemangioblastoma, colloid cyst, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, and craniopharyngioma.
    ...read more...
  • CranialBaseCenterMGH / MEEI Cranial Base Center - Run jointly by Massachusetts General Hospital and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI), the Cranial Base Center treats tumors and other cranial nerve disorders.
    A joint program of the Departments of Otolaryngology, Neurosurgery, and Radiation Oncology dedicated to the evaluation and treatment of patients with cranial base lesions.
    A Multidisciplinary Approach to Rare, Complex Tumors - Because of their location close to a dense concentration of critical structures (the cranial nerves, spinal cord, and major blood vessels to and from the brain), neoplasms of the cranial base — the bony interface separating the brain from the structures outside the cranium — are among the most complex and challenging conditions to treat. Whether benign or malignant, cranial base tumors may be equally problematic; depending on their location, they can affect vision, hearing, olfaction, speech, swallowing, movement, or cognition.
    ...read more...
  • PituitaryTumorPituitary Tumor & Neuroendocrine Clinical Center - The Neuroendocrine Surgical Service at Massachusetts General Hospital evaluates, treats and manages care for patients with pituitary and hypothalamic tumors and other complex disorders. Treatment for adenomas sometimes includes transsphenoidal surgery.
    A multidisciplinary approach to patients with pituitary and hypothalamic disorders. Including the Neuroendocrine Center Bulletin - A newsletter with information regarding pituitary tumors. Information on acromegaly, Cushing's disease or syndrome, prolactinoma, chromophobe or nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma, and thyrotroph adenomas.
    ...read more...
  • NeuroSpineNeurosurgery Spine Service - The Neurosurgical Spine Service at Massachusetts General Hospital specializes in neurosurgical treatment of the entire spectrum of spine disorders, providing services from diagnosis through surgery and rehabilitation.
    Neurosurgical evaluation of neck and back pain, nerve compression syndromes, herniated intervertebral discs, and spinal cord compression syndromes. Information regarding peripheral nerve (including nerve compression such as carpal tunnel syndrome) and spine surgery.
    - Neurosurgical Service's Spine Evaluation Unit
    - Disc & Spinal Cord Compression
    - Spine & Spinal Cord Tumor
    - Brian D. Silber Spine Tumor Clinic
    ...read more...
  • PediatricNeurosurgeryPediatric & Developmental Neurosurgery - The Pediatric Neurosurgical Service, part of MassGeneral Hospital for Children in Boston, diagnoses and treats all neurosurgical conditions of infants, children and adolescents.
    A multidisciplinary team including pediatric neuroncologists and pediatric medical oncologists for the surgical treatment of pediatric brain and spinal tumors. Surgery of developmental anomalies presenting prenatally, in infancy, childhood, or adulthood including tethered spinal cord, spina bifida, syringomyelia, myelomeningocele, hydrocephalus, craniosynostosis, lipoma, dermal sinus, encephalocele, aqueductal stenosis, myeloschisis, lipomyelomeningocele, split cord malformation, diastematomyelia, Klippel-Feil syndrome, CSF shunts, Dandy-Walker cyst, and Arnold-Chiari malformation.
    ...read more...
  • InterventionalNeuroRadiologyMGH Interventional Neuroradiology Center - A minimally invasive approach in the treatment of vascular diseases of the central nervous system. Conditions in the past that would have required surgical intervention such as aneurysms, vascular malformations, and tumors of the brain, spine, head and neck can be considered for treatment by using an endovascular approach to reach the lesion.
    The Purpose of this Center is to provide a complete range of services for the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with neurovascular problems of the brain and spinal cord. Patients may be referred for consultation only, care in partnership with referring physician, or complete management
    ...read more...
  • NeuroImagingNeuro Imaging Resources - Three-dimensional, 2D and functional imaging to visualize cerebral anatomy to enable neurosurgeons to plan procedures to spare crucial cortical areas, improve patient care and reduce operating room time.
    Three-dimensional visualization of cerebral vasculature from CT angiography provides increased confidence in planning surgical intervention in life-threatening aneurysm cases. 3D views of MRI cortical surface and underlying tissues, with optional functional MRI fused with 3D anatomical display, enables neurosurgeons to plan procedures to spare crucial cortical areas, improve patient care and reduce operating room time.
    The MGH Radiology department with specialized units for Neuroradiology, Interventional Neuroradiology and Radiology 3-D Imaging work as multidisciplinary teams with a focus on neurological conditions.
    ...read more...
  • ProtonBeamRadiosurgeryProton Stereotactic Radiosurgery (Neurosurgery) Center - The Proton Beam Unit was founded in 1962 and has the largest experience with stereotactic radiosurgery of any center in the United States. Information regarding non-invasive proton beam radiosurgery and fractionated radiosurgery for brain and spinal tumors and arteriovenous malformations.
    The Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery Center provides a complete range of services for the diagnosis and non-invasive proton beam radiosurgery and fractionated radiosurgery treatment for brain and spinal tumors and other vascular malformations.
    ...read more...
  • PeripheralNervePeripheral Nerve Service - The Peripheral Nerve Surgery Service at Massachusetts General Hospital treats peripheral nerve injuries, tumors and other disorders affecting the network of nerves that link the brain and spinal cord to other parts of the body.
    Advanced Treatment of Peripheral Nerve Issues. One of the only centers in the northeastern United States specializing in surgical treatment of peripheral nervous system disorders, the Peripheral Nerve Surgery Service at Massachusetts General Hospital offers advanced treatment options to restore sensation, movement and motor skills.
    ...read more...
  • FunctionalNeurosurgeryFunctional and Stereotactic Neurosurgery Center - The Functional Neurosurgery Center at Massachusetts General Hospital provides expert evaluations and surgical treatment for patients with movement disorders, epilepsy and psychiatric conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and chronic pain.
    Functional and Stereotactic Neurosurgery Center: Including electrophysiologically monitored pallidotomy for medically refractory Parkinson's disease, obsessive compulsive disorder, cancer-related- and chronic-pain syndromes, thalamotomy for disabling tremor and epilepsy surgery for the surgical treatment of medically refractory seizures.
    ...read more...
  • NeurogeneticSurgeryNeurogenetic Surgery Center - Surgical and non-surgical multidisciplinary management of inherited neurologic syndromes including neurofibromatosis type I (Von Recklinghausen's disease) and II, tuberous sclerosis, and Von Hippel-Lindau disease.
    The Center offers a comprehensive initial evaluation to all persons in whom a diagnosis of neurogenetic associated diseases has been suggested or confirmed. In addition to a neurological examination this includes a dermatological evaluation and referral for neuro-ophthalmological evaluation and imaging studies.
    - Neurogenetics Clinic
    - Neurofibromatosis Clinic
    - Von Hippel-Lindau Clinic
    ...read more...
  • NeuroScienceCareNeurosciences Intensive Care Unit - Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (Neuro ICU) patients receive intensive medical and nursing management for post-surgical and post-interventional conditions, as well as stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, seizure, and head and spinal cord injuries.
    Information on the Neurological Intensive Care Unit (NICU) which provides comprehensive care for seriously ill neurological and neurosurgical patients and Inpatient Information from the Neuroscience Care Units Guest Information System which encompass the Neuroscience, Neurology and Neurosurgery clinical system.
    The MGH Neurointensive Care Unit is a state-of-the-art 18 bed ICU supported by 6-8 full time dedicated Neuro ICU fellows, 8 intensivist faculty, 24 hour video-EEG, portable CT capability, 64-slice helical CT and 1.5-3.0 T MRI with 3D imaging available at all times.
    ...read more...
  • NeuroORNeurosurgery Operating Rooms - Innovative use of technologies to assist surgeons in complex neurological procedures. Information on new intra-operative MRI Imaging, and CT Imaging systems. Use of Stereotactic Neurosurgery for Surgical Case Planning and Optical Tracking Systems (OTS) to define optimal surgical approach.
    Intra-operative mapping by direct cortical stimulation - electrophysiological recordings systems - to map functional anatomy during surgery
    The Neurosurgery ORs features intra-operative imaging, the latest technology in brain tumor removal surgery. Intra-operative MRI and CT scanners provide real-time information, allowing surgeons to monitor a patient’s brain and measure tumor removal at any point during the procedure without moving the patient.
    ...read more...
  • TraumaCriticalCareTrauma, Emergency, Intensive Care, and General Neurosurgery Center - The Spinal Cord and Head Trauma Center, and the NeuroScience Care Units diagnoses and treats patients with severe spinal cord and brain disorders resulting from trauma. Information on Physical Therapy for Brain Injury.
    Massachusetts General Hospital is a Level 1 Adult and Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center. MGH has been verified as able to treat the highest severity of trauma patient. MGH admits, on average, 2,000 trauma patients and another 2,000 emergency surgery patients per year, and although the vast majority of our patients are from the Boston metropolitan area, patients are referred to our facility from all over the country.
    ...read more...
Other neurosurgical intervention across the spectrum of neuroscience care.

Clinical Access Nurse 617-726-2937

For general clinical information or referrals, during normal business hours, please call the Clinical Access Nurse 617-726-2937.



MGH Neurosurgical Service - Phone: 617-8581 - Massachusetts General Hospital - Fruit Street - Boston, Massachusetts 02114